The City of Brass is a delicious debut that deviates from many of the common Fantasy stereotypes. First off, it is set in an alternate historical Middle East, and revolves around a young woman of Egyptian descent, and a young warrior djinn of faith. Chakraborty makes Nahri's and Ali's world feel like it sits somewhere between reality, and the mythical version we hear about in stories. Fantastical elements, even in the few instances where they are used in abundance, always feel grounded by the well-established characters, the historical-feeling setting, and the many issues and perspectives that are of concern in this melting pot. At the book's heart are matters of equality, justice, and rule. Both Nahri and Ali in particular are deeply driven by the idea of right and wrong, while others, such as Nahri's romantic interest, the daeva Dara, and Ali's father, the ruler of Daevabad, are set in their resolve. This is one of the things that makes this novel so interesting; it discusses the moral implications of actions versus the practical. Still, even with so much to sate are minds, it is the characters that we keenly follow. Their story will not go the way that you expect, and that is one of the other ways that makes this book different from many Fantasy. Each twist is thrilling because it affects the characters in profound ways. We'll only find out the results of the last set of twists in the next book, but at least we aren't left wondering. Chakraborty leaves us with a very satisfying conclusion to a wonderfully written, fully fleshed out story. This is one that will appeal to both teens and adults because the type of writing fits snugly in both spheres.

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