A Fatal Lie

A Fatal Lie

Book - 2021
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"If there's ever been a more complex and compelling hero in crime fiction than Inspector Rutledge, I can't think of one."--Jeffery Deaver

In one of his most puzzling cases, Scotland Yard Inspector Ian Rutledge must delve deep into a dead man's life and his past to find a killer determined to keep dark secrets buried.

A peaceful Welsh village is thrown into turmoil when a terrified boy stumbles on a body in a nearby river. The man appears to have fallen from the canal aqueduct spanning the valley. But there is no identification on the body, he isn't a local, and no one will admit to having seen him before. With little to go on, the village police turn to Scotland Yard for help.

When Inspector Ian Rutledge is sent from London to find answers, he is given few clues--a faded military tattoo on the victim's arm and an unusual label in the collar of his shirt. They eventually lead him to the victim's identity: Sam Milford. By all accounts, he was a good man and well-respected. Then, why is his death so mysterious? Looking for the truth, Rutledge uncovers a web of lies swirling around a suicidal woman, a child's tragic fate, another woman bent on protecting her past. But where among all the lies is the motive for murder?

To track a killer, Rutledge must retrace Milford's last journey. Yet death seems to stalk his every move, and the truth seems to shift at every turn. Man or woman, this murderer stays in the shadows, and it will take desperate measures to lure him--or her--into the light.

Publisher: New York, New York : William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, ©2021.
ISBN: 9780062905574
Characteristics: 336 pages ;,24 cm.

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PeterP2
Apr 12, 2021

Big fan of Charles Todd novels but this one is the most convoluted todate. Simple too many characters, too much driving around in circles and near the conclusion, I do not think Rudledge even slept at all for two days. The solving of the "mystery" was weak as was the ultimate conclusion. Still worth the read but below par.

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brit4321
Apr 12, 2021

I've read every Charles Todd book, and this is the weakest one IMO. The story is too convoluted. And it seems to be stretched out far too much. I loved all the earlier book but this and the last one or two have been disappointing. Maybe they've just run out of ideas.....

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denville
Mar 27, 2021

Wales, a fall/murder, a missing child. Nefarious attorneys and convoluted family relationships. A war damaged inspector. Intriguing.

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maggiezad
Mar 18, 2021

Great story and great plot. A small statured man is found murdered. Why? Especially when he was the pillar of his community and newly returned home. Our favorite British Inspector has to go to bat and figure out why this man was killed and why. Before he does there are other deaths to solve as well all related to a missing little girl. This one was a great read and I highly recommend it to all who love this mother-son writing combo.

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maipenrai
Feb 24, 2021

I wait a year for the next Ian Rutledge mystery and then enjoy the book so much that I read it in two days. The crux of this book is the disappearance / kidnapping / death of a small child. Many are hiding secrets and perhaps the child. This is one of my favorite mystery series. Kristi & Abby Tabby

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maipenrai
Feb 24, 2021

I wait a year for the next Ian Rutledge mystery and then enjoy the book so much that I read it in two days. The crux of this book is the disappearance / kidnapping / death of a small child. Many are hiding secrets and perhaps the child. This is one of my favorite mystery series. Kristi & Abby Tabby

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brangwinn
Feb 16, 2021

This post-World War I mystery sends Scotland Yard Inspector Ian Rutledge to the Wales. What appears to be not so complicated a case turns into a multiple-murder and kidnapping case. The mystery and setting are interesting but for readers who met Rutledge in the 22 previous books of the series it’s the details about World War I that are most interesting. Dealing with the death of a man who had served in the Bantam Battalions, a unit comprised of men too short in stature to meet the Army’s entrance standards, Rutledge not only has to confront other soldiers who returned from the war, but he must deal with his own PTSD. It wasn’t acknowledged as an issue until recently, but it has been around since man went to war. Then it was looked on as “lacking moral fiber” or cowardice then. It is increasingly difficult for Rutledge to deal with his PSTD as he gets deeper into solving the murders. Its also a wonderful look at a local that while not hostile to strangers, people aren’t welcoming either making Rutledge’s case more difficult.

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