Brown Girl Dreaming

Brown Girl Dreaming

Audiobook CD - 2014
Average Rating:
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Stories of the author's childhood from the '60s and '70s told in prose.
Publisher: [New York] : Listening Library, [2014]
Edition: Unabridged
ISBN: 9780553397260
0553397265
Branch Call Number: JB WOODSON
Characteristics: 4 audio discs (3 hr., 56 min.) :,digital ;,4 3/4 in

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JCLEmilyD Jun 01, 2017

Brown Girl Dreaming is the beautiful telling of Woodson's childhood in verse.
Woodson was born in 1963 so her story is intertwined with the story of civil
rights. Woodson is a very accomplished author and poet, she's written several
children's books as well as adult novels. Woodson is a storyteller, it's her gift.
I want to read all her books!

CircMary Apr 03, 2017

This free verse gem is an extra special experience as an audiobook read by the author. As an adult reader/listener, Woodson's snatches of childhood memories will draw you in and remind you of your own special stories that need to be told.

JCLBeckyC Mar 01, 2017

I'd read this book two years ago, but this time around I tried the audiobook, read by the author, the inimitable Jacqueline Woodson. Her voice adds a richness and depth that makes the poems pop. I LOVE this audiobook, and I plan on recommending it to everyone I meet.

e
EXLIBRES
Aug 05, 2016

Very Inspiringly! >for all ages.

CRRL_RebeccaPurdy Jul 02, 2015

Read by the author, this is the amazing story of a young girl finding her place in the world, even as her physical location continues to change.

natalie_g Dec 31, 2014

Worthy of all the great reviews! Appeals to all ages. Everyone will be touched by her stories in a different way.

In her memoir, Woodson shares what it was like to grow up black in the 1960s and 1970s, during the Civil Rights movement, in both the North and the South, always supported by deep family love. Told in verse, the book also describes her joy at finding her voice through writing.

In her memoir, Woodson shares what it was like to grow up black in the 1960s and 1970s, during the Civil Rights movement, in both the North and the South, always supported by deep family love. Told in verse, the book also describes her joy at finding her voice through writing.

Jacqueline Woodson reads her autobiographical poetry to us, her own voice lending its authenticity to the story, sharing her life and inspiring us. My favorite poem is "Stevie and Me" in which Jacqueline describes going to the library with her mother every Monday and being allowed to pick seven books of her own choice. On this day she discovers "Stevie" by Jon Steptoe.

Two excerpts from the poem:

1.

If someone had been fussing with me

to read like my sister, I might have missed

the picture book filled with brown people, more

brown people than I’d ever seen

in a book before

2.

If someone had taken

that book out of my hand

said, You’re too old for this

maybe

I’d never have believed

that someone who looked like me

could be in the pages of the book

that someone who looked like me

had a story.

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